High Visibility Important To Young Oklahoma Logger

Implementation Timeline
June 21, 2016
Helpful Analysis
October 3, 2016
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High Visibility Important To Young Oklahoma Logger

Chris Gibson

Chris Gibson, 29, is a fourth generation logger out of Broken Bow, Okla., who delivers part of his production through a company called Chris Gibson Trucking, LLC. He goes to extra lengths to make his trucks and trailers highly visible, in part because his primary customer, Weyerhaeuser, demands it, and in part because he simply believes it is the right thing to do.

Gibson refers to this Pete 389 as his “John Deere” truck.

Gibson refers to this Pete 389 as his “John Deere” truck.

His three trucks—two 2016 Kenworth W900s and a 2016 Peterbilt 389—feature bright paint and have amber lights on their headache racks. He also applies extra DOT reflector tape to the lower parts of the corner bunks of his trailers. On his four-bunk types he adds a front-facing amber LED light at the top of the front stakes, which he admits he has to replace occasionally because they can be casualties in the loading process.

Note front stake lights on trailer in left background

Note front stake lights on trailer in left background

“This makes the trucks more visible for oncoming traffic,” he believes. “With that light at the top of the stakes, it represents the highest point on both the truck and the trailer.”

The logger also added air ratchets and auto-tensioning straps on his four-bunk trailers to keep loads securely tightened in case the load settles or shifts during transport.

Gibson also abides by another Weyerhaeuser requirement: that his trucks run with lights on, night and day.

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